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It's your typical young adult supernatural thriller along the lines of Goosebumps. I couldn't remember the title, only what it was about, and no one seemed to know what book it was.Recently I found it and I, once again, devoured it. I found the three of them caught my attention and held onto it. The backstory given by Gossick, which I won't go into here because of spoilers, was very well done and even knowing the story already I couldn't stop reading to find out what happened next.

We have a teenage boy, Dusty, who is compelled to kill young woman by a force unknown.

He even ends up somehow aiding in the investigation to capture the killer that was himself.

The most amazing thing about this is how much you come to care fo Disturbing--that's how I'd described Pike's book if I was only allowed one word in any review.

But for a novel about a teenage serial killer, this story goes much deeper than those unfamiliar with Pike would expect.

Exploring Dusty's mind is scary and tragic, but Pike pulls it off brilliantly.

This book was also before it's time, talking about Kaballah (he spells it Cabala, which is legitimate considering that it's a transliteration from Hebrew, and writt Here is an example of Christopher Pike's better works. And the random sexual references were kept to a minimum this time. Mc Fadden (Pike's real last name.)Reading Christopher Pike is like going home.

Obviously it is geared towards a specific audience, so my expectations were adjusted for that (an adult reading a "young adult" novel has to take it for what it is.) Unlike in his earlier works, he treats his readers as an intelligent audience, tying in history in a relevant way. I did find one typo where a word was accidentally left out, but that's the editor's fault. No matter at what age and stage I read his books, they will always please me and remind me of all the good times. He is one of the earliest authors I have read and his books have sort of defined my reading trajectory up until a certain point.

Here is an example of Christopher Pike's better works.

Obviously it is geared towards a specific audience, so my expectations were adjusted for that (an adult reading a "young adult" novel has to take it for what it is.) Unlike in his earlier works, he treats his readers as an intelligent audience, tying in history in a relevant way.

Disturbing--that's how I'd described Pike's book if I was only allowed one word in any review.

Intense, semi-historical, and definitely disturbing; that about sums up what you'll feel after reading this.

Dusty Shame was a high school senior, and a serial killer.