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23-Jul-2017 01:10 by 2 Comments

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“It’s the world’s oldest profession,” Williams said.

“This is just the latest attempt to shut down online sex work advertising,” Maxine Doogan, president of the Erotic Service Providers Legal, Education and Research Project, said in a statement. All it will do is make sex workers less safe and vulnerable to violence and extortion. While Craigslist was able to thrive after shutting down its adult section in 2010 by charging users to post jobs and apartment vacancies, 90 percent of Backpage’s profits are believed to come from their adult advertisements -- earning its owners a whopping

“It’s the world’s oldest profession,” Williams said.“This is just the latest attempt to shut down online sex work advertising,” Maxine Doogan, president of the Erotic Service Providers Legal, Education and Research Project, said in a statement. All it will do is make sex workers less safe and vulnerable to violence and extortion. While Craigslist was able to thrive after shutting down its adult section in 2010 by charging users to post jobs and apartment vacancies, 90 percent of Backpage’s profits are believed to come from their adult advertisements -- earning its owners a whopping $1.5 million to $2.5 million a month in California alone.Backpage charges users $1 to post an ad in the dating section and many women are known to repost every half hour.“A closer review of that “moderation” process reveals, however, that Backpage has maintained a practice of altering ads before publication by deleting words, phrases, and images indicative of an illegal transaction.” The report continued: “Backpage had good reason to conceal its editing practices: Those practices served to sanitize the content of innumerable advertisements for illegal transactions — even as Backpage represented to the public and the courts that it merely hosted content created by others.” It is unclear if Backpage continues to edit its users’ more explicit posts.The report – and subsequent shutting down of the Adult section – was met at first with praise from some in law enforcement and anti-sex trafficking groups, but other activists argue that the move will not stop prostitutes from posting ads online and will actually make sex work more dangerous. Government is jeopardizing the lives of sex workers to boost their political careers.” The future for Backpage and a prostitute’s personal page is unclear.It also forbids “posting any solicitation directly or in ‘coded’ fashion for any illegal service exchanging sexual favors for money” and posting “any material on the Site that exploits minors in any way.” A quick search of the Backpage’s dating section for Manhattan, however, found posts featuring phrases like “Naked Bodyslides,” “2 Girl Special” and “Busty and Petite.” The classified site also has said it's protected from prosecution because of the interpretation of a provision tucked deep inside the Communications Decency Act of 1996 called Section 230.

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“It’s the world’s oldest profession,” Williams said.

“This is just the latest attempt to shut down online sex work advertising,” Maxine Doogan, president of the Erotic Service Providers Legal, Education and Research Project, said in a statement. All it will do is make sex workers less safe and vulnerable to violence and extortion. While Craigslist was able to thrive after shutting down its adult section in 2010 by charging users to post jobs and apartment vacancies, 90 percent of Backpage’s profits are believed to come from their adult advertisements -- earning its owners a whopping $1.5 million to $2.5 million a month in California alone.

Backpage charges users $1 to post an ad in the dating section and many women are known to repost every half hour.

“A closer review of that “moderation” process reveals, however, that Backpage has maintained a practice of altering ads before publication by deleting words, phrases, and images indicative of an illegal transaction.” The report continued: “Backpage had good reason to conceal its editing practices: Those practices served to sanitize the content of innumerable advertisements for illegal transactions — even as Backpage represented to the public and the courts that it merely hosted content created by others.” It is unclear if Backpage continues to edit its users’ more explicit posts.

The report – and subsequent shutting down of the Adult section – was met at first with praise from some in law enforcement and anti-sex trafficking groups, but other activists argue that the move will not stop prostitutes from posting ads online and will actually make sex work more dangerous. Government is jeopardizing the lives of sex workers to boost their political careers.” The future for Backpage and a prostitute’s personal page is unclear.

It also forbids “posting any solicitation directly or in ‘coded’ fashion for any illegal service exchanging sexual favors for money” and posting “any material on the Site that exploits minors in any way.” A quick search of the Backpage’s dating section for Manhattan, however, found posts featuring phrases like “Naked Bodyslides,” “2 Girl Special” and “Busty and Petite.” The classified site also has said it's protected from prosecution because of the interpretation of a provision tucked deep inside the Communications Decency Act of 1996 called Section 230.

.5 million to .5 million a month in California alone.

Backpage charges users

“It’s the world’s oldest profession,” Williams said.“This is just the latest attempt to shut down online sex work advertising,” Maxine Doogan, president of the Erotic Service Providers Legal, Education and Research Project, said in a statement. All it will do is make sex workers less safe and vulnerable to violence and extortion. While Craigslist was able to thrive after shutting down its adult section in 2010 by charging users to post jobs and apartment vacancies, 90 percent of Backpage’s profits are believed to come from their adult advertisements -- earning its owners a whopping $1.5 million to $2.5 million a month in California alone.Backpage charges users $1 to post an ad in the dating section and many women are known to repost every half hour.“A closer review of that “moderation” process reveals, however, that Backpage has maintained a practice of altering ads before publication by deleting words, phrases, and images indicative of an illegal transaction.” The report continued: “Backpage had good reason to conceal its editing practices: Those practices served to sanitize the content of innumerable advertisements for illegal transactions — even as Backpage represented to the public and the courts that it merely hosted content created by others.” It is unclear if Backpage continues to edit its users’ more explicit posts.The report – and subsequent shutting down of the Adult section – was met at first with praise from some in law enforcement and anti-sex trafficking groups, but other activists argue that the move will not stop prostitutes from posting ads online and will actually make sex work more dangerous. Government is jeopardizing the lives of sex workers to boost their political careers.” The future for Backpage and a prostitute’s personal page is unclear.It also forbids “posting any solicitation directly or in ‘coded’ fashion for any illegal service exchanging sexual favors for money” and posting “any material on the Site that exploits minors in any way.” A quick search of the Backpage’s dating section for Manhattan, however, found posts featuring phrases like “Naked Bodyslides,” “2 Girl Special” and “Busty and Petite.” The classified site also has said it's protected from prosecution because of the interpretation of a provision tucked deep inside the Communications Decency Act of 1996 called Section 230.

||

“It’s the world’s oldest profession,” Williams said.

“This is just the latest attempt to shut down online sex work advertising,” Maxine Doogan, president of the Erotic Service Providers Legal, Education and Research Project, said in a statement. All it will do is make sex workers less safe and vulnerable to violence and extortion. While Craigslist was able to thrive after shutting down its adult section in 2010 by charging users to post jobs and apartment vacancies, 90 percent of Backpage’s profits are believed to come from their adult advertisements -- earning its owners a whopping $1.5 million to $2.5 million a month in California alone.

Backpage charges users $1 to post an ad in the dating section and many women are known to repost every half hour.

“A closer review of that “moderation” process reveals, however, that Backpage has maintained a practice of altering ads before publication by deleting words, phrases, and images indicative of an illegal transaction.” The report continued: “Backpage had good reason to conceal its editing practices: Those practices served to sanitize the content of innumerable advertisements for illegal transactions — even as Backpage represented to the public and the courts that it merely hosted content created by others.” It is unclear if Backpage continues to edit its users’ more explicit posts.

The report – and subsequent shutting down of the Adult section – was met at first with praise from some in law enforcement and anti-sex trafficking groups, but other activists argue that the move will not stop prostitutes from posting ads online and will actually make sex work more dangerous. Government is jeopardizing the lives of sex workers to boost their political careers.” The future for Backpage and a prostitute’s personal page is unclear.

It also forbids “posting any solicitation directly or in ‘coded’ fashion for any illegal service exchanging sexual favors for money” and posting “any material on the Site that exploits minors in any way.” A quick search of the Backpage’s dating section for Manhattan, however, found posts featuring phrases like “Naked Bodyslides,” “2 Girl Special” and “Busty and Petite.” The classified site also has said it's protected from prosecution because of the interpretation of a provision tucked deep inside the Communications Decency Act of 1996 called Section 230.

to post an ad in the dating section and many women are known to repost every half hour.

“A closer review of that “moderation” process reveals, however, that Backpage has maintained a practice of altering ads before publication by deleting words, phrases, and images indicative of an illegal transaction.” The report continued: “Backpage had good reason to conceal its editing practices: Those practices served to sanitize the content of innumerable advertisements for illegal transactions — even as Backpage represented to the public and the courts that it merely hosted content created by others.” It is unclear if Backpage continues to edit its users’ more explicit posts.

The report – and subsequent shutting down of the Adult section – was met at first with praise from some in law enforcement and anti-sex trafficking groups, but other activists argue that the move will not stop prostitutes from posting ads online and will actually make sex work more dangerous. Government is jeopardizing the lives of sex workers to boost their political careers.” The future for Backpage and a prostitute’s personal page is unclear.

It also forbids “posting any solicitation directly or in ‘coded’ fashion for any illegal service exchanging sexual favors for money” and posting “any material on the Site that exploits minors in any way.” A quick search of the Backpage’s dating section for Manhattan, however, found posts featuring phrases like “Naked Bodyslides,” “2 Girl Special” and “Busty and Petite.” The classified site also has said it's protected from prosecution because of the interpretation of a provision tucked deep inside the Communications Decency Act of 1996 called Section 230.

The language of Section 230 states, “No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provided by another information content provider." In layman’s terms, this basically means that sites like Backpage – or Facebook and Twitter, for that matter -- are not liable for what their users post on their sites.

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The report struck Backpage like a bombshell and – along with Visa, Mastercard and American Express all voluntarily putting a halt to accepting business from Backpage in 2015 – led the site to not just shut its Adult section but remove it from its homepage all together.

Backpage did not respond to Fox News’ request for comment, but on the website's Terms page states that users must refrain from “posting adult content or explicit adult material unless” it is in the adult category, permitted under federal, state and local law and the one doing the posting is over 18 years of age.

Many sites start out free, build up their membership, then start charging members to use the site or some features. 10 billion matches later, Tinder has changed the way people meet around the world. Tinder is a powerful tool to meet people, expand your social group, meet locals when you’re traveling and find people you otherwise never would have met.

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