Conflict of interest dating

14-Jun-2016 07:27 by 6 Comments

Conflict of interest dating - dating groups chicago

If questions or concerns arise regarding potential harassment or discrimination, the employee should contact the EAD.

In relationships with students, the employee is expected to be aware of his/her professional responsibilities and to avoid apparent or actual conflict of interest, favoritism or bias.

VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY HUMAN RESOURCES POLICIES AND PROCEDURESSUBJECT: RELATIONSHIPS IN THE WORKPLACEEFFECTIVE DATE: July 1, 2015 Vanderbilt University strives to be a family-friendly workplace and is committed to maintaining an environment in which members of the University community can work together to further education, research, patient care and community service.

This policy provides guidelines for visitors in the workplace, family members working at Vanderbilt and relationships at work Children, family members, associates or friends are welcome for occasional, brief visits in the workplace.

These relationships, even if consensual, may ultimately result in conflict or difficulties in the workplace.

If such a relationship currently exists or develops, it must be disclosed: C. When employees interact with students, staff are in a position of trust and power.

Any employee who engages in such a relationship must accept responsibility for assuring that it does not result in a conflict of interest or raise other issues of professionalism.

In cases of doubt, advice and counsel should be sought from the EAD or a Human Resources Consultant.Employees who engage in personal relationships (including romantic and sexual relationships) should be aware of their professional responsibilities and will be responsible for assuring that the relationship does not raise concerns about favoritism, bias, ethics and conflict of interest.In cases of doubt, advice and counsel should be sought from the next level of administrator, Employee Relations or the Employee Opportunity, Affirmative Action and Disability Services (EAD). Romantic or sexual relationships between employees where one individual has influence or control over the other's conditions of employment are inappropriate.In some offices, they “look the other way.” While some people generally discourage such relationships, others argue that they can be conducted without difficulty; the keys to successfully managing them are maturity, common-sense, and forethought.At our organization, two members of the executive team are married to one another.If a relationship is deemed to be inappropriate under these guidelines, the appropriate department head or next level of administrator, after consultation with the EAD and a Human Resources Consultant will take appropriate action.